Stanley Kubrick’s sci-fi classic 2001: A Space Odyssey – has been discovered in a remote area of the Utah desert

Stanley Kubrick’s sci-fi classic 2001: A Space Odyssey – has been discovered in a remote area of the Utah desert

A mystical object mirroring the unattached board figures of the late Minimalist craftsman, John McCracken, or even the monolith in ‘A Space Odyssey’ sci-fi (2001) by Stanley Kubrick, was found standing in a faraway land of the Utah desert.

Scientists of the Utah Division of Wildlife detected the monolith from a helicopter while leading a drill count of bighorn sheep nearby. Though the area of the monolith has not been unveiled, an airborne film showing the body introduced inside a red stone ravine proposes that it lives some place in southern Utah, which has a particular ‘topological’ scene.

Bret Hutchings first spotted the monolith while piloting a helicopter over the area. According to Hutchings, it has all the earmarks of being produced using steel or metal, and is estimated to stand between 10 and 12ft high. It is stated that the monolith was likely introduced on the site as opposed to being dropped from above by ‘visitors’. Photographs and aerial footage of this colossal metallic monument quickly spread over social media, sparking many conspiracy theories of alien visitors. Though these theories are popular, this occurrence is probably better explained as a new wave art piece.

It is not uncommon for ‘Land Art’ to pop up around the Southwest of the United States, as artists continue to use these remote areas to produce an air of mystery around their work. For example, the works of Robert Smithson’s ‘Magnum Opus Spiral Jetty (1970)’, and Michael Heizer’s ‘Double Negative (1969)’.

Currently an artist is still yet to claim this piece, despite some speculation that it may have been some of the late work of McCracken.

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