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Tom R. Chambers is a visual artist, and he is currently working with the pixel as Minimalist Art ("Pixelscapes") and Kazimir Malevich's "Black Square" ("Black Square Interpretations"). He has over 100 exhibitions to his credit.

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INSTAGRAM Photos
ON EXHIBITION

1) My Dear Malevich, Suprematism Infinity: Reflections, Interpretations, Explorations (Group Show), Atrium Gallery, Harriman Institute, Columbia University, New York City, New York, U.S.A., December 1, 2015 - January 22, 2016 (pdf). Click on SIRIE to view photographs (by Cho Eun-mi) of the opening. Note: this work was donated to the Russian American Cultural Center (RACC) Art Collection, New York City (letter).

Note: this exhibition is in conjunction with the "100 Years of Suprematism" conference, Shapiro Center, Columbia University, New York City, December 11 - 12, 2015. It is organized in celebration of the centenary of Kazimir Malevich’s invention of Suprematism and the first public display of his Suprematist paintings in December, 1915. The two-day conference is organized in association with the Harriman Institute, the Lazar Khidekel Society, and SHERA. It features presentations by an international and renowned group of scholars. Among them are leading researchers in the field from the United States, Russia, and the United Kingdom. The event includes a presentation of "Kazimir Malevich: Letters and Documents, Memoirs and Criticism" (London: Tate, 2015) (pdf) (http://tomrchambers.com/Malevich Society.htm).


2) My Dear Malevich, Black Square Interpretations and Other Suprematist Explorations (two-person show with Max Semakov), CaviArt Gallery, Russian Cultural Center, Houston, Texas, March 6 - April 7, 2015. Tom R. Chambers and Max Semakov/MiMs Art Group come together to pay tribute to Kazimir Malevich through a series of artworks that interpret his "Black Square", and explore Suprematism. Chambers is based in Houston, Texas, and Semakov is based in Moscow, Russia, which moves this collaboration to a higher plane of exchange between the citizenry of two countries - America and Russia. Chambers and Semakov through their interpretations and explorations move Suprematism in the direction of Neo-Suprematism. Their artworks accentuate and cultivate non-objectivity - the supremacy of pure feeling in creative art. Click on BSIOSE to view photographs (by Cho Eun-mi) of the opening.


3) My Dear Malevich, Beyond the Borders [The Guest section] (Group Show), Novosibirsk Municipal Center of Fine Arts, Novosibirsk, Russia, November 3 - 21, 2010.

             


4) MDM-1 [My Dear Malevich], Homage: Contemporary Art in Digital Media (Group Show), Art Institute of California, San Diego, California, U.S.A., October 8 - November 8, 2010.


5) My Dear Malevich and Pixelscapes: First and Second Generations, The H Gallery, Houston, Texas, U.S.A., July 10 - August 9, 2010.


6) MDM-1 [My Dear Malevich], Homage: Contemporary Art in Digital Media (Group Show), Escondido Arts Partnership Municipal Gallery, Escondido, California, U.S.A., July 9 - August 21, 2010.

Catalog:

      


7) Novosibirsk State Art Museum [as a part of the aniGma-4, Fourth Novosibirsk International Festival of Digital Imaging], Novosibirsk, Russia [May 10 - June 10, 2007]

Brochure and Poster:

      


8) Art Gallery, Fine Arts Department, Zhaoqing University, Zhaoqing, China [April 2 - 15, 2007]

Poster:


9) Museum of Computer Art [MOCA] [April - 2007]

Artist ON EXHIBITION Image 1
Artist ON EXHIBITION Image 2
VIDEOS
ABOUT ME

 

BIOGRAPHY

 

Tom R. Chambers | 3500 Greystone Drive  #101, Austin, Texas, U.S.A. | 832-873-0207 | tom@tomrchambers.com | http://tomrchambers.com

Tom R. Chambers is a visual artist (digital/new media and mixed media), documentarian, curator and educator with over 100 personal exhibitions worldwide. He has also curated numerous exhibitions in the U.S.A., Zimbabwe, China and India.

He is currently working with the pixel as Minimalist Art, Kazimir Malevich’s “Black Square” and Suprematism. His "My Dear Malevich" project has received international acclaim, and it was shown as a part of “Suprematism Infinity: Reflections, Interpretations, Explorations”, Atrium Gallery, Harriman Institute, Columbia University, New York City, New York (December 1, 2015 - January 22, 2016) and in conjunction with the "100 Years of Suprematism" conference, Shapiro Center, Columbia University, New York City (December 11 - 12, 2015) (Organized in celebration of the centenary of Kazimir Malevich’s invention of Suprematism and the first public display of his Suprematist paintings in December, 1915.).

 

2

 

Chambers curated the two-person (him and Max Semakov [Moscow, Russia]) exhibition, “Black Square Interpretations and Other Suprematist Explorations”, which was shown at the CaviArt Gallery, Russian Cultural Center, Houston, Texas (March 6 - April 7, 2015) (BSI). A portion of this exhibition was also shown as a part of “Post Scriptum 100 + 8”, OMG Gallery, Moscow, Russia (June 8 - July 8, 2015) (Chambers came together with seven Russian artists in Moscow to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Suprematism [1915-2015].) (Interview.).

Chambers was Visiting Lecturer in digital/new media art for the Fine Arts Department, Zhaoqing University, Zhaoqing, China (2005 – 2007). He joined the department to develop and teach a digital/new media art program. He also curated numerous student exhibitions. While in China, he developed his “Tom Series” project, which has been shown in eighteen exhibitions worldwide (2006-2015) (Chambers utilizes the self-portrait to project his life experiences. His portrait remains constant with the experience [situation] indicated as a change or flux in the image. The accompanying text details his experience with the inclusion of links to the Internet for additional information. The project is not only an artwork about Chambers' life - biography (visual/textual) - but also a reference tool, a study of history through his existence.).

He was invited by the National Institute of Design (NID) in Ahmedabad, India to conduct a three-week, new media art workshop for its new media design graduate students. The workshop culminated in the exhibition, “NMA@NID” (2006) (The no-constraints workshop encouraged self-expression through computer technology within a fine arts context.

 

3

 

According to Chambers, art created via new media should follow traditional conventions in the sense of appreciation for existing foundations and their various art movements. An overview of the exhibition sees an emotional component and search for truth that permeate the fine arts.).

Chambers was Executive Committee Member and Juror for the International Digital Art Awards (IDAA) (2003-2005). He was instrumental in expanding the content of the IDAA to include new media art, and served as online New Media Director (2004-2005). He was also instrumental in helping to bring the 2005 IDAA Exhibition to Beijing, China under the auspices of the Beijing Film Academy. He was also invited by the Fine Arts Department, New Media Art, Beijing Film Academy, Beijing, China to give a retrospective lecture, “Dyer Street Portraiture to Pixelscapes” (April 8, 2005).

He was on the faculty for Photo-Seminars.com (no longer online). His documentary portraiture lesson is featured at Profotos.com and others. He organized and curated two hyperlinked photo exhibitions for the PhotoForum membership under the auspices of the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), New York.

Chambers completed a three-year tour as a United States Peace Corps Volunteer in the Arts (curator/archivist and initiator/instructor [“The McEwen Photographic Studio”]) for the National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe (1993-1995). He was instrumental in writing grant proposals and receiving funding to computerize the gallery’s Permanent Collection information. He also curated numerous exhibitions from the Permanent Collection.

 

4

 

He was invited by the gallery to exhibit “Variations on the Dan Mask(Chambers used an African Traditional mask from the Dan Tribe in Eastern Liberia [a piece from the Permanent Collection: PC - 6400 – 0147] as the object for the photogram, then manipulated the non-exposed area generated from this original mask form to vary the look.) (December 1995; officially opened by the U.S. Ambassador to Zimbabwe).

While in Zimbabwe, he also received a U.S. Government Grant via the United States Information Service (USIS), Harare to exhibit “Southwest Of Rusape: The Mucharambeyi Connection” at the USIS Gallery (June-July 1995; officially opened by the U.S. Ambassador to Zimbabwe; and accepted as a part of the USIS Archives Permanent Collection).

His tribute piece (mixed media/interactive work), “Mother's 45s” was selected through national search for exhibition as a part of the “Parents” show at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio (catalogue #: ISBN #0-932706-20-7) (1992). This work was also shown at Gallery One, Providence, Rhode Island (1990).

American Photo magazine listed one of his documentary projects, “Dyer Street Portraiture” in the Notable Exhibitions section of its March, 1986 issue ("The black-and-white images record a diversity of common people in an urban habitat with an ambiance of film noir."). Chambers founded and directed a not-for-profit, photographic arts organization and gallery, “Viewpoint”, Lubbock, Texas (American Photo magazine reviewed one of the exhibitions at the gallery in its April, 1983 issue) (1982-1983). He also founded and directed a not-for-profit, photographic arts organization, “Photoreach”, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A. (1990).

5

 

His documentary project, “Descendants 350” was shown throughout Rhode Island, and accepted by the Secretary of State (Rhode Island) as a part of the Rhode Island State Archives Permanent Collection (1990) (The project received a Governor's [Rhode Island] Proclamation).

Chambers was listed (1984-1991) in the Artists-In-Education roster with the Rhode Island State Council for the Arts (RISCA), and served as an advisory panelist for RISCA to determine funding for residency programs. He also served as an advisory panelist for the State of Connecticut Commission on the Arts to determine funding for residency programs.

He provided documentation of the homeless and poor (Rhode Island Food Bank, 1986), the elderly (Brown University and the Andrus Foundation/American Association for Retired Persons, 1987), and city life and politics (Executive Office of the Mayor, Providence, Rhode Island). He also provided documentation for the Rhode Island Delegation at the Democratic National Convention, Atlanta, Georgia (1988), which culminated in the exhibition, “Hot City”.

Chambers conducted Polaroid workshops for at-risk, inner-city youth in Providence, Rhode Island for Metro Arts, and served as an advisory panelist for the organization (1986-1990). He also produced and directed visual arts/performance arts presentations, “VP90” (“Release”) and “CYSX2” as a part of First Night Providence, Providence, Rhode Island (1989-1991).

He worked with Harvey J. Bott (Loft on Strand) to document his sculpture and assemblages. He also had a two-person show with Bott providing his (Chambers’) perspective on the sculptor’s Fetal Form series, “Tom Chambers Looks at H.J. Bott”, Rosenberg Library, Galveston, Texas (1974).

Tom R. Chambers | 3500 Greystone Drive  #101, Austin, Texas, U.S.A. | 832-873-0207 | tom@tomrchambers.com | http://tomrchambers.com

 

ABOUT ME Image 1
ABOUT ME Image 2
BIOGRAPHY

 

BIOGRAPHY

 

Tom R. Chambers | 3500 Greystone Drive  #101, Austin, Texas, U.S.A. | 832-873-0207 | tom@tomrchambers.com | http://tomrchambers.com

Tom R. Chambers is a visual artist (digital/new media and mixed media), documentarian, curator and educator with over 100 personal exhibitions worldwide. He has also curated numerous exhibitions in the U.S.A., Zimbabwe, China and India.

He is currently working with the pixel as Minimalist Art, Kazimir Malevich’s “Black Square” and Suprematism. His "My Dear Malevich" project has received international acclaim, and it was shown as a part of “Suprematism Infinity: Reflections, Interpretations, Explorations”, Atrium Gallery, Harriman Institute, Columbia University, New York City, New York (December 1, 2015 - January 22, 2016) and in conjunction with the "100 Years of Suprematism" conference, Shapiro Center, Columbia University, New York City (December 11 - 12, 2015) (Organized in celebration of the centenary of Kazimir Malevich’s invention of Suprematism and the first public display of his Suprematist paintings in December, 1915.).

 

2

 

Chambers curated the two-person (him and Max Semakov [Moscow, Russia]) exhibition, “Black Square Interpretations and Other Suprematist Explorations”, which was shown at the CaviArt Gallery, Russian Cultural Center, Houston, Texas (March 6 - April 7, 2015) (BSI). A portion of this exhibition was also shown as a part of “Post Scriptum 100 + 8”, OMG Gallery, Moscow, Russia (June 8 - July 8, 2015) (Chambers came together with seven Russian artists in Moscow to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Suprematism [1915-2015].) (Interview.).

Chambers was Visiting Lecturer in digital/new media art for the Fine Arts Department, Zhaoqing University, Zhaoqing, China (2005 – 2007). He joined the department to develop and teach a digital/new media art program. He also curated numerous student exhibitions. While in China, he developed his “Tom Series” project, which has been shown in eighteen exhibitions worldwide (2006-2015) (Chambers utilizes the self-portrait to project his life experiences. His portrait remains constant with the experience [situation] indicated as a change or flux in the image. The accompanying text details his experience with the inclusion of links to the Internet for additional information. The project is not only an artwork about Chambers' life - biography (visual/textual) - but also a reference tool, a study of history through his existence.).

He was invited by the National Institute of Design (NID) in Ahmedabad, India to conduct a three-week, new media art workshop for its new media design graduate students. The workshop culminated in the exhibition, “NMA@NID” (2006) (The no-constraints workshop encouraged self-expression through computer technology within a fine arts context.

 

3

 

According to Chambers, art created via new media should follow traditional conventions in the sense of appreciation for existing foundations and their various art movements. An overview of the exhibition sees an emotional component and search for truth that permeate the fine arts.).

Chambers was Executive Committee Member and Juror for the International Digital Art Awards (IDAA) (2003-2005). He was instrumental in expanding the content of the IDAA to include new media art, and served as online New Media Director (2004-2005). He was also instrumental in helping to bring the 2005 IDAA Exhibition to Beijing, China under the auspices of the Beijing Film Academy. He was also invited by the Fine Arts Department, New Media Art, Beijing Film Academy, Beijing, China to give a retrospective lecture, “Dyer Street Portraiture to Pixelscapes” (April 8, 2005).

He was on the faculty for Photo-Seminars.com (no longer online). His documentary portraiture lesson is featured at Profotos.com and others. He organized and curated two hyperlinked photo exhibitions for the PhotoForum membership under the auspices of the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), New York.

Chambers completed a three-year tour as a United States Peace Corps Volunteer in the Arts (curator/archivist and initiator/instructor [“The McEwen Photographic Studio”]) for the National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe (1993-1995). He was instrumental in writing grant proposals and receiving funding to computerize the gallery’s Permanent Collection information. He also curated numerous exhibitions from the Permanent Collection.

 

4

 

He was invited by the gallery to exhibit “Variations on the Dan Mask(Chambers used an African Traditional mask from the Dan Tribe in Eastern Liberia [a piece from the Permanent Collection: PC - 6400 – 0147] as the object for the photogram, then manipulated the non-exposed area generated from this original mask form to vary the look.) (December 1995; officially opened by the U.S. Ambassador to Zimbabwe).

While in Zimbabwe, he also received a U.S. Government Grant via the United States Information Service (USIS), Harare to exhibit “Southwest Of Rusape: The Mucharambeyi Connection” at the USIS Gallery (June-July 1995; officially opened by the U.S. Ambassador to Zimbabwe; and accepted as a part of the USIS Archives Permanent Collection).

His tribute piece (mixed media/interactive work), “Mother's 45s” was selected through national search for exhibition as a part of the “Parents” show at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio (catalogue #: ISBN #0-932706-20-7) (1992). This work was also shown at Gallery One, Providence, Rhode Island (1990).

American Photo magazine listed one of his documentary projects, “Dyer Street Portraiture” in the Notable Exhibitions section of its March, 1986 issue ("The black-and-white images record a diversity of common people in an urban habitat with an ambiance of film noir."). Chambers founded and directed a not-for-profit, photographic arts organization and gallery, “Viewpoint”, Lubbock, Texas (American Photo magazine reviewed one of the exhibitions at the gallery in its April, 1983 issue) (1982-1983). He also founded and directed a not-for-profit, photographic arts organization, “Photoreach”, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A. (1990).

5

 

His documentary project, “Descendants 350” was shown throughout Rhode Island, and accepted by the Secretary of State (Rhode Island) as a part of the Rhode Island State Archives Permanent Collection (1990) (The project received a Governor's [Rhode Island] Proclamation).

Chambers was listed (1984-1991) in the Artists-In-Education roster with the Rhode Island State Council for the Arts (RISCA), and served as an advisory panelist for RISCA to determine funding for residency programs. He also served as an advisory panelist for the State of Connecticut Commission on the Arts to determine funding for residency programs.

He provided documentation of the homeless and poor (Rhode Island Food Bank, 1986), the elderly (Brown University and the Andrus Foundation/American Association for Retired Persons, 1987), and city life and politics (Executive Office of the Mayor, Providence, Rhode Island). He also provided documentation for the Rhode Island Delegation at the Democratic National Convention, Atlanta, Georgia (1988), which culminated in the exhibition, “Hot City”.

Chambers conducted Polaroid workshops for at-risk, inner-city youth in Providence, Rhode Island for Metro Arts, and served as an advisory panelist for the organization (1986-1990). He also produced and directed visual arts/performance arts presentations, “VP90” (“Release”) and “CYSX2” as a part of First Night Providence, Providence, Rhode Island (1989-1991).

He worked with Harvey J. Bott (Loft on Strand) to document his sculpture and assemblages. He also had a two-person show with Bott providing his (Chambers’) perspective on the sculptor’s Fetal Form series, “Tom Chambers Looks at H.J. Bott”, Rosenberg Library, Galveston, Texas (1974).

Tom R. Chambers | 3500 Greystone Drive  #101, Austin, Texas, U.S.A. | 832-873-0207 | tom@tomrchambers.com | http://tomrchambers.com

Artist BIOGRAPHY Image 1
Artist BIOGRAPHY Image 2
TECHNIQUE

Artist Statement


"Good technique is necessary to attain a certain level of craftsmanship and competence, but more importantly, is the nurturing of the psyche to a level where the technique becomes second nature, so the subconscious prevails over the conscious (the physical doing).


This is where creativity is found within all of us. Technique is only a means to that end, but many artists and photographers flounder, because they have become good craftsmen only, by mastering just the technique and not themselves (their subconscious).


Once this subconscious comes to the forefront with a medium, the image or the incorporation of the image as a part of a whole, transcends the medium and becomes truth for its creator, the artist/photographer. In other words, the image itself or as an item, has no significance.


What is significant is the artist/photographer subconsciously offering truth through the image or the incorporation of the image as a part of a whole to evoke viewer response and effect change, whether it is within the subtleties of a straightforward documentary image or within a blatant juxtaposition of an image with other media."

Tom R. Chambers

EXPERTISE

Review by JD Jarvis, Art Critic/Artist and coauthor of "Going Digital: The Practice and Vision of Digital Artists" (ISBN 1-59200-918-2) [USA]:

"Can an exhibition of art be both physical and virtual, a historical yet avant-garde, forward-looking homage with one foot in the current 21st century digital art scene and the other in the rich 20th century history of Modernist art? The answer is, "yes!" If you are Tom Chambers and your base of operations is the Fine Arts Department of Zhaoqing University in the Guangdong Province of China.

For several years now, Mr. Chambers has treated his students at Zhaoqing University and their peers at selected universities ranging from Wake Forest University, the University of Louisville, the Art Institute of Boston, the State Art Museum of Novosibirsk, Russia, Rensselaer Polytechnic in Troy, New York (among others), as well as, anyone with access to the web to a cross cultural mix of student digital art and photography. Based on themes from "Self/Soul", "Into the Future" or the color "Red" these projects are brimming with culture and art. Chambers has infused his students with his own sense of wonder, introspection and a desire to examine and communicate.

Which brings us to one of Tom Chambers' own most recent and personal exhibitions entitled "My Dear Malevich" on display from April 2 through 15 in the art gallery of Zhaoqing University. This is the physical/virtual part of this exhibit. Wherein we see on the web a presentation of what must be, in real-time and space, a very striking exhibit. Consisting of many, large-size, black and white prints of hard-edged geometric designs "My Dear Malevich" is also an homage to the Russian artist who carried earlier Cubist work entirely into the abstract and non-representational. Kasimir Malevich founded the Suprematist art movement around 1913 and opened the door to true non-objectivity in modern art.

This exhibition expands inward (so to speak) from research into the progenitors of Minimalism, an artform in which Mr. Chambers has been experimenting for several years with his series of "Pixelscapes" exhibitions. Utilizing the most basic unit of any computer graphic; the single pixel, his "Pixelscapes" serve as colorful pathways into the purely metaphysical aspects of art which, by virtue of presenting so little, leads the viewer to so much in terms of their own emotional content.

With "My Dear Malevich," Chambers describes for the viewer a process by which he travels (via magnification) into a digitized photograph of Malevich and discovers at the singular pixel level arrangements which echo back directly to Malevich's own totally abstract compositions. This process is such an apt metaphor for Malevich's own journey deep with himself, as well as, his discovery of the non-objective soul of art contained within the objective world as to constitute a form of visual poetry.

This visual poetry contains the ironic connection between Modernist philosophy which moved visual art from figurative representational pictures of the physical world into an expressive and emotional world of abstraction; and, the digital realm in which the purely abstract unit of one pixel off - one pixel on, has been utilized to reproduce once again, with breath taking accuracy the physical world. Now, Chambers' has shown a path by which this tool, which so often serves hyper-reality, is forced to reveal the abstract soul at its very core. Was Malevich thinking in "pixels" without knowledge of the term and even many decades before the fact of the technology, which utilizes this basic component? His association with Futurism might account for this sort of metaphysical connection. And, so it is that we have the aspect of this exhibition that straddles a whole century of art. From the earliest beginnings of Modern art to the latest developments in the tools by which the newest works are being made. The ground that is covered is immense, but the time between the two virtually disappears in this exhibit. It seems that with "My Dear Malevich" it is not a matter of what is old (or new) being new (or old) again; but that what is "old" and "new" exists simultaneously. That which is "gone" is also, at the very same time, ever-present."


Comment by Harvey J. Bott, Sculptor [USA]:

"JD Jarvis' review is a most essential discourse of not only this historically portentous exhibition but of you and your oeuvre stratagem, an investiture of nearly ineffable wonder that says virtual past-present-future brought to the e-world and now the reality of tangible documentation in a venue that Malevich would have been proud to share with you."


Comment by Laurence Gartel [He is considered the "father of the digital art movement", and he has been a pioneer in this field for over 30 years.][USA]:

"What can be said about Pixelscapes? They're beautiful - DYNAMIC. Like Josef Albers except this work is lyrical. I really like the evolution of the square. Its a movement that reminds me of my movement. I also like the squares that are surrounding your portrait. Does this mean that the artist is the original square? The artist turns into color? Or is it so that the artist turns into art? An interesting transformation. In any case, it is a wonderful journey."


Comment by Sandra Boccara, wife of the late Laurent Boccara, Painter and Collage Artist [Go to The Laurent Boccara Foundation Mission Statement.][USA]:

"Synchronicity is alive and well as I view your Malevich exhibition ... so reminiscent of the work and intentions of my husband's work, Laurent Boccara."


Comment by Andrey Martynov, Curator, Novosibirsk State Art Museum, Novosibirsk [Russia]:

"Chambers' Pixelscapes have been exhibited in Novosibirsk and also at the Solovetsky Monastery. He is working with the idea of a small unit or cell of an image, which shows a fantastical world through print and animation. He will show this new black-and-white series - MY DEAR MALEVICH - at the Fourth Novosibirsk International Festival of Digital Imaging at the Novosibirsk State Art Museum in May/June. It will be a pleasure for us to show this series that stems from the Suprematist traditions of the great Malevich.

Kasimir Malevich was a remarkable artist of the 20th century who looked deeply into the philosophical content of images. Chambers uses this same philosophy in his long-term art projects such as Pixelscapes. And what is especially pleasant is that he brings his understanding and knowledge to art students at Zhaoqing University in China who are just beginning their artistic studies.

Congratulations!"


Comment by Christina Lodder, Professor of Art History, University of Saint Andrews, Scotland [Author of "Russian Constructivism" (ISBN 0-300-03406-7) and "Malevich" (ISBN 0-7148-3912-4); Vice President, The Malevich Society][UK]:

"What you are doing looks very exciting."


Comment by Sara Tucker, Director of Digital Media, Dia Center for the Arts, New York [USA]:

"It's an elegant idea and well executed."


Comment by Mark Tribe, Assistant Professor, Modern Culture/Media Studies, Brown University and Founder of Rhizome.org [USA]:

"Congrats! It's a terrific project."


Comment by Mark Amerika, Associate Professor, Dept. of Art and Art History, University of Colorado at Boulder , Boulder, Colorado [USA]:

"While China itself is going through a kind of postproduction remix phase, I'm interested in the way you are remixing the digitized version of Malevich, as an image, within the traditional context of both gallery and object, while highlighting the pixel as the primary visual element in the making of new work.

Congrats on your show! The documentation of it makes it look very exciting and I am intrigued by it."


Comment by Joe Nalven, Cultural Anthropologist, Founder/Editor of Digital Art Guild and coauthor of "Going Digital: The Practice and Vision of Digital Artists" (ISBN 1-59200-918-2) [USA]:

"Kasimir Malevich covers a wide range of styles and color/black-white imaging. Tom Chambers has isolated and deepened that side of Malevich's non-representational and devilishly focused square (and what we now see in the pixel). The presentation is austere with no one - unlike Chambers' other online shows with many others in dynamic interaction, but rather we see reflections of the same images in the ceiling and the floor, creating a space not unlike the George Lucas sci-fi THX-1138 movie. The absence of people in the exhibition rooms mirrors their absence in the imagery.

But is this calm? Is it provocative? Are there any emotions? Malevich's striving to strip away content associations may have been poured into his work, but how a viewer sees these images can be quite otherwise. So, too, Chambers' images.

Tom Chambers has created a dialogue running back and forth in time about this very seductive side of making images. Of course, should Chambers continue down this path, what will happen to the pixel analogy when he chances upon Malevich's black circle? I'm sure we will all be delighted."


Comment by Shankar Barua, Artist/Musician/Writer/Designer [Founder and Managing Trustee for The Academy of Electronic Arts, creator of "The Idea" and Director of The Carnival of e-Creativity & Change-agents Conclave][India]:

"As an old believer in the singular importance of Tom Chambers' creative explorations with regard to driving a leading-edge stream of evolution of the digital-still-image-as-art into this new millennium, I am absolutely delighted to see him go back to print after the fascinating Pixelscapes diversion, with this stunning new exhibition, 'My Dear Malevich'. Not that I know anything much about fine arts, but in this rising new era of burgeoning empowerment of individuals by technology across all streams of human endeavour, all over the world, when the more popular leading-edges of many creative streams are often about little more than fascination and infatuation with the shiny new baubles of new mediums in themselves, it is important to so manifest and be reminded that high art should certainly derive from, and serve, much deeper folds in the brains of any individual, community and generation."


Comment by Istvan Horkay, Artist [He is currently collaborating with Peter Greenaway (film director) on the Tulse Luper film series.][Hungary]:

"Your art epitomizes the double meaning of the word: a fragment, an incised part of something already in existence - and just because of this incision - is an injury to the finished surface, to the tangle of writing or a finished picture. It is the same and not the same at the same time. Once the signs are scars, then the wounds will tell tales of some non-alleviated history. The post-human art of our era has moved the farthest away from the ideal which reached the calmness of total emptiness by putting instincts to silence - consequently, your Pixelcapes."


Comment by Allan Revich, Artist and Director of Digital Salon [USA]:

"Tom Chambers is blessed with an uncanny ability to marry high-concept with visual beauty. He demonstrates his ability to do so in his 'My Dear Malevich' exhibition, where he riffs on the work of the Suprematist artist, Kasimir Malevich, to create wonderfully intriguing Pixelscapes. Chambers' Pixelscapes merge the analog and digital worlds, and merge the past with the present to create a new kind of imagery that brings wall-based visual art into the 21st century. His work is interesting to think about, and pleasant to look at. What more can we ask for from the art on our walls?"


Comment by Michael Takeo Magruder, New Media Artist and Researcher, King's Visualisation Lab, King's College London, London, England [UK]:

"I very much enjoy the critical, analytical and aesthetic nature of the artwork. As you are aware, much of my own work is an exploration of the digitally minimal and the fundamental structures that comprise media technology - so I feel well-placed to understand and comment on your artistic concerns in this area. I feel that many contemporary artists working in New Media utilise the pixel without understanding its core essence in terms of both technology that creates it and the connections it has to the art historical past.

I did not have such negative feelings when considering this body of work. I find the premise of the work is a relevant extension of the Suprematism and Minimalism art movements of the 20th century, in which you revisit critical explorations from the past and augment your investigations with present day technologies and context."


Comment by Harold Olejarz, Artist and Art Educator at Eisenhower Middle School [U.S. Department of Education National Blue Ribbon School][USA]:

"At the beginning of the 20th century Kazimir Malevich was at the forefront of a revolution in art. His work took chances and explored new directions in representation. Malevich was an experimenter, pushing art to the edges.

Today, at the beginning of the 21st Century, Tom Chambers' work bridges 100 years of art history and creates connections between his own ground-breaking work as a digital artist and the ground-breaking work of Malevich. Chambers' Pixelscapes explore issues of digital representation as well as refer back to the seminal dialog about representation that Malevich and his contemporaries initiated. Look beneath the elegant simplicity of the art of Malevich and Chambers and you will find the essential building blocks of art. Look closely at Chambers' images and you will find the building blocks of today's digital revolution."


Comment by Joseph Havel, Sculptor [Director of The Glassell School of Art, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston][USA]:

"The work is very interesting."


Comment by Ray L. Steele, Director, Center for Information and Communication Sciences, Ball State University and Executive Director, The International Digital Media and Arts Association (iDMAa) [USA]:

"An exciting review and a thoughtful tribute to creative work. Congrats."


Comment by Cecil Herring, Artist [USA}:

"My first thought upon seeing your powerful show in black and white was an homage to the 'Tomb of the Unknown Soldier' and also the Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn novel, 'One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich', where with the least amount of freedom and the smallest bit of material, the hero saves a bit of comb and some trinkets. His soul is still his soul, and he can make something of nothing - no color, no material - and no one can take that from him. Stark? Yes. Art? Yes! Congratulations!"


Comment by Bruce Hanks, Manager, University of Winnipeg Instructional Network, Center for Teaching, Learning and Technology [CDDL], The University of Winnipeg [Canada]:

"Black Square [1915], consisting of nothing more than a black square on a white field - one of Kazimir Malevich's earliest works into Suprematism - becomes the starting point, ninety two years later, for an exhibition by Tom Chambers simply titled My Dear Malevich.

This is not necessarily new work for Chambers. In 2000 he explored the pixel in what has become his ongoing exploration under the namesake of Pixelscapes [A pixel (picture element) being a single point in a graphic image, an abstract sample.]. In his article The pixel as Minimal art, reference is made to Malevich's Black Square (1915) and Black Cross (1923). What is new about My Dear Malevich, is Chambers removing the pixel from the screen and placing it on a gallery wall as large digital images, a transfer that becomes an all at once opportunity to see the totality of the work. To enter a space and see larger than life pixels displayed one after the other in all their complex diversity allows for a truly meditative experience. What is more interesting is Chambers' starting point for the project, a photograph of Malevich in which he turned the telescope around and concentrated on a small area of the image. By enlarging this one small area, the pixels become a vast universe of the nonobjective out of which emerged the exhibition My Dear Malevich."


Comment by Bill Spencer, Director of Technology, Nocona Independent School District, Nocona, Texas [Chambers' hometown][USA]:

"Your work is very interesting to say the least. I am a biologist by training, and I compare the pixel to a living cell. Alas, but even the cell and pixel have even smaller components to consider.

I do not know much about Minimalism, but I am interested in finding the basic unit of thought, learning, intelligence, and personality. Where the realm of thought intersects with the laws of physics that govern this plane of existence may hold the answers to the nature of human experience including art appreciation and other high levels of thinking.

I enjoy your exhibits and hope you continue to produce thought provoking material."


Comment by Claude Bossett, Artist [Unveiled a tribute to the pixel for its 50th Birthday [2004] by painting a 60 cm x 60 cm blue square on a 100 cm x 140 cm canvas.][Austria]:

"A refreshing extrapolation of the pixel, and it appears to be well accepted [balanced] all around."


Comment by Franklin W. Robinson, the Richard J. Schwartz Director of the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University [USA]:

"The variety and range of what you do, your imagination and originality, are just amazing."


Comment by Ansgard Thomson, Artist [Canada]:

"The fascination with this study is the time spent to truly bring to us the pure abstraction of the pixel we digital artists use everyday and even project into a visual installation at a live performance of digital fine arts that must be a visual sensation for all participants. I personally visualize the installation with the classical electronic music by Warren Furman."


Comment by Peter Ciccariello, Artist [USA]:

"Fascinating project - image reduced to its fundamental core, pointing with delicious lyricism to the singularity of the source."


Comment by Vlatko Ceric, Artist [Croatia]:

"I know your Pixelscapes work quite well, and I find it very interesting. The My Dear Malevich exhibition is absolutely fascinating. What a range of impressions you are creating out of a very few pixels."


Comment by Xu Hongbo, Art Professor, Fine Arts Department, Zhaoqing University [China]:

"Malevich is a traditional resource of art. Chambers uses it like a Chinese Artist uses the traditional form of brush painting. The abstract works of Malevich were studied by Chinese artists 10 to 15 years ago. Why did this study cease? I think because this kind of art doesn't have Chinese roots. We can become enlightened again through Chambers' exhibition. Most contemporary Chinese artists do not address this form with ease like their predecessors."


Comment by Wu Nan, Art Professor, Fine Arts Department, Zhaoqing University [China]:

"Tom R. Chambers is a blend of the West and the East - frank and charming with a disposition of an Eastern writer - and this combination seems consistent when viewing his early photographic works, which are full of humanity, morality and caring.

His recent creative work, 'My Dear Malevich' has a very different connotation: bright and fashionable, which conjures up skin texture within a multi-colored grid or graph. The meaning is manifested within a Western world's characteristics of materialism, public display and desire with curious, affective tonal range and realm of imagination - it's beckoning.

Chambers seems to want to elucidate a subject ... make a significant attempt at clarifying a notion. His appreciation of Kasimir Malevich's Suprematist artwork is only a way or an excuse to present an artistic trend through iconography that borders on 'religion'. The Pixelscapes that comprise the project represent a collective expression.

The subtle grays, blacks and whites combined with the cross symbol remind us of a certain 'awe'. The artworks transmit a solemnity and moving atmosphere. The expression is direct and effective, which is the most obvious characteristic of contemporary art."


Comment by Don Archer, Director, Museum Of Computer Art [MOCA][USA][Twelve out of the 19 Pixelscapes that comprise MY DEAR MALEVICH are on exhibit at MOCA.]:

"Tom R. Chambers has been an iconoclastic digital artist and passionate teacher of digital art for many years. He is most recently visiting lecturer on digital and new media art and digital photography in the Fine Arts Department of Zhaoqing University in Zhaoqing, China. His own art is a celebration of digital abstraction and reductionism in a long series of works that he calls "Pixelscapes." His most recent series is called "My Dear Malevich" and is a tribute to the celebrated Ukranian-born artist Kasimir Malevich (1878-1935] who was founder of Suprematism, a non-representational art that featured geometric forms and shapes. These new images are a confirmation of Chambers' dedication to minimalist art and to the pixel, in all its potential and limitations."


Comment by Luca LUNK Leggero, New Media Artist [Creator of How to make a perfect Malevich using only basic HTML code][Italy]:

"I really like 'MY DEAR MALEVICH'. I think the concept behind 'Pixelscapes' is fascinating. It is also interesting that Malevich is important for new media/net artists."


Comment by Ruchira Parihar, New Media Design graduate student, National Institute of Design [NID], Ahmedabad, India [Ms. Parihar studied with Tom R. Chambers as a part of his workshop and NMA@NID exhibition at NID, July, 2006.][India]:

"Heartiest congratulations - wonderful concept and brilliant execution."


Click on process to view Chambers' approach to the pixel(s) in the Malevich photo.

Click on TRC/MDM to view Tom R. Chambers with two of his Pixelscapes.

 

 

Artist EXPERTISE Image 1
Artist EXPERTISE Image 2
AWARDS

Tom R. Chambers is a documentary photographer and visual artist, and he is currently working with the pixel as Minimalist Art ("Pixelscapes") and Kazimir Malevich's "Black Square" ("Black Square Interpretations"). He has over 100 exhibitions to his credit. His "My Dear Malevich" project has received international acclaim, and it was shown as a part of the "Suprematism Infinity: Reflections, Interpretations, Explorations" exhibition in conjunction with the "100 Years of Suprematism" conference at Columbia University, New York City (2015).

Chambers' project, "Tom Series" has been shown in eighteen exhibitions worldwide (2006-2015). He utilizes the self-portrait to project his life experiences.

He was invited by the National Institute of Design (NID) in Ahmedabad, India to conduct a three-week, new media art workshop for its new media design graduate students. The workshop culminated in the exhibition, "NMA@NID" (2006).

Chambers was Visiting Lecturer in Digital/New Media Art for the Fine Arts Department, Zhaoqing University, Zhaoqing, China (2005-2007). He joined the department to develop and teach a digital/new media art program. He also curated numerous student exhibitions.

He was Executive Committee Member and Juror for the International Digital Art Awards (IDAA) (2003-2005). He was instrumental in expanding the content of the IDAA to include new media art, and served as online New Media Director (2004-2005).

Chambers completed a three-year tour as a United States Peace Corps Volunteer in the Arts (curator/archivist and initiator/instructor ["The McEwen Photographic Studio"]) for the National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe (1993-1995). He was instrumental in writing grant proposals and receiving funding to computerize the gallery’s Permanent Collection information. He also curated numerous exhibitions from the Permanent Collection.

His tribute piece (mixed media/interactive work), "Mother's 45s" was selected through national search for exhibition as a part of the "Parents" show at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio, 1992.

Chambers' project, "Descendants 350" was shown throughout Rhode Island, and accepted by the Secretary of State (Rhode Island) as a part of the Rhode Island State Archives Permanent Collection (1990) (The project received a Governor's [Rhode Island] Proclamation).

American Photo magazine listed one of his projects, "Dyer Street Portraiture" in the Notable Exhibitions section of its March, 1986 issue ("The black-andwhite images record a diversity of common people in an urban habitat with an ambiance of film noir.").

Artist AWARDS Image 1
Artist AWARDS Image 2
Artist AWARDS Image 3
PAST EXHIBITIONS

EXHIBITIONS/SCREENINGS


A Night at the Silver Top

1) Po Gallery/Anchor Project (three-person show), Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1992.

This photo documentary project focuses on the customers who frequent the diner, Silver Top in Providence, Rhode Island. The diner has been a fixture at the corner of Harris Avenue and Kinsley since the 1930s. During its heyday, the Silver Top would stay open 24 hours, feeding the city’s factory workers on their way home from the third shift. In more recent years, it has opened after midnight and closed around dawn, catering to the after-the-bars-close crowd.


Black Square Interpretations

1) Black Square Space (article) (Black Square Interpretations), International Digital Art Gallery (D-ART) for the 22nd International Conference on Information Visualization & 15th Conference Computer Graphics, Imaging and Visualization, University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy, July 10-13, 2018. Organized in London, England.

Images of the Universe (courtesy of HubbleSite [http://hubblesite.org]) are used in combination with Kazimir Malevich's "Black Square" to confirm his (Malevich) interest in Astronomy and connection of his Suprematist work with the Universe. The "Space" images have been pixelated to show abstractions - configurations of pixels - running throughout the "Black Square" and beyond ("white abyss"). Malevich's "Black Square" becomes monolithic/monumental. Malevich called himself, "President of s(S)pace".

http://tomrchambers.com/bsc.html

2) Black Square Desecration, Experimental Animation and Video Art Program, LINOLEUM International Contemporary Animation and Media-Art Festival, Ukraine, September 28 - October 1, 2017.

Kazimir Malevich's "Black Square" (1915) receives glitch treatment - perceived as "desecration" - and perhaps embraced by this Suprematist if he were alive today. Suprematism is based upon "the supremacy of pure artistic feeling" (sensation), and the kinetic glitch treatment enhances these emotions via pixel reconfigurations, the introduction of color fields and movement. The sound component complements the feeling. This video piece could be viewed as Neo-Suprematism.

http://tomrchambers.com/bsd.html

3) Beyond Black Square, Digital Art Community (DAC) installation, SIGGRAPH 2017, Los Angeles, July 30 - August 3, 2017.

This project is a video/installation piece that moves Kazimir Malevich's "Black Square" in the direction of Neo-Suprematism. It also simulates the evolution of the bar code system.

http://tomrchambers.com/beyond_bs.html

4) Red Sweep Black Square, Suprematism Infinity: Reflections, Interpretations, Explorations (group show), Atrium Gallery, Harriman Institute, Columbia University, New York City, New York, U.S.A., December 1, 2015 - January 22, 2016.

This project is a video/installation piece re: Kazimir Malevich's "Black Square" and "Red Square", both exhibited in 1915. They approximate being one and the same, but Malevich considered his "Black Square" to be the true icon - its zero form - for Suprematism. In Malevich's system, the movement from black-and-white Suprematism to colored and finally to white Suprematism was indicated by three squares: a black, a red, and a white one. (Vitebsk, Aleksandra Shatskikh, 2007 [1917-1922])

The first time Malevich exhibited his "Red Square", in 1915, it was subtitled "Pictorial Realism of a Peasant in Two Dimensions". During the Vitebsk years, the representation of the "Red Square" was politicized. Lazar Lissitzky had a hand in this Bolshevization of the Suprematist figure. He turned the "Red Square" into the Unovis seal. However, Malevich and all the other Suprematist-Unovis members deemed the "Black Square" to be the true symbol of Unovis. (Vitebsk, Aleksandra Shatskikh, 2007 [1917-1922])

In the video, the sweeping of the color red acknowledges "Red Square" as a Suprematist figure, but there is always a return to the true icon, "Black Square" for Suprematism.

http://tomrchambers.com/bs_rs.html

http://tomrchambers.com/sirie_opening.html

Note: this exhibition is in conjunction with the "100 Years of Suprematism" conference, Shapiro Center, Columbia University, New York City, December 11 - 12, 2015. It is organized in celebration of the centenary of Kazimir Malevich’s invention of Suprematism and the first public display of his Suprematist paintings in December, 1915. The two-day conference is organized in association with the Harriman Institute, the Lazar Khidekel Society, and SHERA. It features presentations by an international and renowned group of scholars. Among them are leading researchers in the field from the United States, Russia, and the United Kingdom. The event includes a presentation of "Kazimir Malevich: Letters and Documents, Memoirs and Criticism" (London: Tate, 2015).

http://tomrchambers.com/Malevich Society.htm

5) Post Scriptum 100 + 8 (group show), One Month Gallery (OMG), Moscow, Russia, June 8 - July 8, 2015.

6) CaviArt Gallery (two-person show), The Russian Cultural Center, Houston, Texas, U.S.A., March 6 – April 7, 2015.

This project pays tribute to Kazimir Malevich through a series of artworks that interpret his "Black Square", and explore Suprematism. Chambers through his interpretations moves Suprematism in the direction of Neo-Suprematism. His artworks accentuate and cultivate non-objectivity - the supremacy of pure feeling in creative art.

http://tomrchambers.com/bsi.html

http://tomrchambers.com/bsiose_opening.html


Buddha Earth

1) Common Ground (Digital Art for a Healthy Planet) (group show), A&I Gallery, Los Angeles, California, U.S.A., July 8 - August 13, 2010.

2) Common Ground (Digital Art for a Healthy Planet) (group show) (Limited Edition Commemorative Book; all the book proceeds donated to these environmental non-profit organizations: The World Wildlife Fund, Global Giving, and the Global Environmental Institute.), Huan Tie Art Museum, Beijing, China, November 9 - 19, 2008.

Courtesy of Common Ground: bringing together art, technology and philanthropy to focus attention on - and raise money for - environmental projects worldwide; an online community of artists, designers, galleries, curators, art patrons, art institutions, art consumers and concerned corporate citizens; international touring exhibition and media events highlighting digital art in limited edition reproductions and commemorative books, all focused on the theme of environmental stewardship; a corporate sponsored, brand extension series of events that generates media coverage through artist and celebrity participation, with visibility on television, print media and on the Web; and through this visibility and art sales, awareness and funds for environmental stewardship projects.

http://tomrchambers.com/be.html


Descendants 350

1) Rhode Island State Archives (solo show) (accepted by the Secretary of State as a part of the Rhode Island State Archives Permanent Collection), Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A. 1991.

2) The Old Colony House (solo show) (sponsored by the Secretary of State's Office, Rhode Island), Newport, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1988.

3) The State House (solo show) (sponsored by the Secretary of State's Office, Rhode Island; and received a Governor's Proclamation), Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1988.

4) The Barrington Public Library (solo show) (sponsored by the Daughters of the American Revolution), Barrington, Rhode Island, U.S.A. 1988.

5) Faculty Club Gallery (solo show), Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1987.

6) The Warwick Museum of Art (solo show), Warwick, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1987.

7) The Narragansett Pier Free Library (solo show) (sponsored by the Narragansett Historical Society), Narrangansett, Rhode Island, U.S.A. 1987.

8) CCE Gallery (solo show), The University of Rhode Island, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1987.

9) The Roger Williams Park Museum (solo show) (sponsored by the City of Providence), Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A. 1987.

10) The Fleet Center Gallery (solo show) (grant - Providence 350, Inc.), Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A. 1986.

This photo documentary project of Descendants of many of the First Settlers of Rhode Island pays tribute to the trials and tribulations that their Ancestors were subjected to during the early to middle 1600s. It offers a unique look and study of the State's early history as it relates to images of Descendants (contemporaries) as icons or symbols to talk about their Ancestors' (First Settlers') contributions through text extracted from The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island (and other sources). This project was funded by Providence 350, Inc. as a part of Rhode Island's 350th Anniversary Celebration, 1986; and it received a Proclamation from Edward DiPrete, Governor of Rhode Island.

http://tomrchambers.com/index-27.html


Dyer Street Portraiture

1) PhotoForum Online Gallery (solo show), Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York, U.S.A., 1997.

2) Photo 1991, Lincoln (Flanagan) Campus Art Gallery (group show), Community College of Rhode Island, Lincoln, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1991.

3) Photo Show 1988, Corridor Gallery (group show), Department of Transportation (sponsored by the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts), Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1988.

4) The Silver Bullet Gallery (solo show) (listed in the Notable Exhibitions section of American Photo magazine, March, 1986), Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A. 1986.

5) Photo 1985, The Gallery of Fine Arts (group show), Daytona Beach Community College, Daytona Beach, Florida, U.S.A., 1985.

6) Southern Light Gallery (solo show), Amarillo College, Amarillo, Texas, U.S.A., 1985.

This photo documentary project records the denizens of a particular military street - Dyer Street – in El Paso, Texas. American Photo magazine listed the project in its Notable Exhibitions section, March, 1986: "The black-and-white images record a diversity of common people in an urban habitat with an ambiance of film noir."

http://tomrchambers.com/index-20.html


Geo, Blades, Mutation

1) IDAA 2001 (group show), Noosa Regional Gallery, Noosaville, Australia, 2001.

http://tomrchambers.com/geoa.html


Hometown

1) Emerging Rhode Island Artists, Corridor Gallery (group show) (sponsored by the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts), T.F. Green Airport, Warwick, Rhode Island, U.S.A. 1986.


Hot City

1) G.F. Gallery (solo show), Austin, Texas, U.S.A., February 20 - March 12, 1992.

2) Corridor Gallery (solo show), Rhode Island Hospital Trust National Bank, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., June 16 - August 31, 1989.

This photo documentary project is based on Chambers’ coverage of Providence, Rhode Island as Personal Photographer to Mayor Joseph R. Paolino, Jr. and City Photographer during 1985 - 1989. The project received a grant from Rhode Island Hospital Trust National Bank; was accepted as part of the City of Providence Archives; received a Mayor's Proclamation; and was listed in American Photo magazine, Notable Exhibitions section, July, 1989 issue.

http://tomrchambers.com/index-25.html


In and Out

1) Photo Show 1987 (group show), Gallery One, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1987.


In Black and White

1) Rhode Island Black Heritage Society (solo show), Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1991.

This photo documentary project comprises black and white photographs that focus on the Black community in Providence, Rhode Island. It is based on Chambers’ coverage of Providence, Rhode Island as Personal Photographer to Mayor Joseph R. Paolino, Jr. and City Photographer during 1985 - 1989. The project received a grant from The Rhode Island Black Heritage Society; and it was accepted as part of their archives.


Kites for Ghandhi

1) NMA@NID (group show), National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad, India, July 10 – 28, 2006.

This new media project involves Flash when Chambers was conducting a new media art workshop at the National Institute of Design in India. Kites are significant in India to rejoice in the spirit of the day and as a part of the Makar Sankranti Festival (change of season), and Mahatma Gandhi spent a portion of his life at an ashram (hermitage) near Ahmedabad. Chambers created this movie as an offering and out of respect for this philosopher and leader of the people.

http://tomrchambers.com/kites_for_g.html
http://tomrchambers.com/nmaatnid.html


Little Tommy

1) Digital Art Community (DAC) installation, SIGGRAPH 2017, Los Angeles, July 30 - August 3, 2017.

This new media project involves a photograph of Chambers taken around the age of two or so (1949-1950). The kinetic, glitch treatment addresses the mind attempting to grasp the far past - and extreme youth - but just can't get there in full, consequently, the break up of the short-lived image, over and over.

http://tomrchambers.com/little_tommy.html


Mattie Oline: Thoughts of a Grandmother

1) Tales 'N' Trails Museum, Nocona, Texas, September 23 - October 27, 2017.

This project is a tribute to Chambers' grandmother, Mattie Oline (Battles) Meekins, 1899-1997. She kept a diary from 1948 through part of 1993. Chambers researched her entries over the years, and chose the ones that have significance for him and society. His grandmother rarely missed making a daily entry in her diary during 45-plus years - an astonishing 16,000-plus entries. Chambers was born in July of 1947, so her diaries were ongoing from when he was about six-months old through the age of 45. The entries are practical, heartfelt and country-bred.

His grandmother's handwriting is used to provide an immediacy - connection - with Mattie Oline. Notes are used to add more information. He hopes that his grandmother would understand why he has chosen to go public with some of her diary entries: to pay tribute to an individual who helped raise him; and to indicate his sense of longing for her presence. As a former educator, he also sees merit in using family diaries as educational tools.

http://tomrchambers.com/motg_showpieces.html

This project has a partnership link on the Texas State Historical Association website:

https://www.tshaonline.org/links


Med-Lines

1) Medical Library (solo show), Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, Texas, U.S.A., 1982.

This photo project focuses on the architecture of the Health Sciences Center to generate abstract interpretations.


Mexico: A Package Tour

1) The Museum of Texas Tech University (solo show), Lubbock, Texas, U.S.A., 1981.

This photo documentary project focuses on the people and environs of Taxco, Mexico.


Mother’s 45s

1) Parents (group show), Museum of Contemporary Art, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio, U.S.A. (selected through national competition), April 13 - May 14, 1992.

2) Gallery One (solo show), Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., April, 1990.

Photographs of Chambers’ mother are sequenced according to the chronology of her life, which spans almost 60 years (1925-1983). When the piece is viewed along with the songs his mother once listened to, the sound stimulus pulls the viewer from record to record (1 - 45), and this process has some interesting points: the maturation process of his mother is seen; the man who came into her life and eventually became her husband and his father is seen; the maturation process of her only child (him) is seen; the change in hair and fashion styles is seen; the change in automobile models is seen; and various locales throughout the United States are seen. This project (and its success) is the high point of Chambers’ career for the simple reason that it involves and perpetuates his mother's existence.

http://tomrchambers.com/index-13.html


My Dear Malevich

1) Suprematism Infinity: Reflections, Interpretations, Explorations (group show), Atrium Gallery, Harriman Institute, Columbia University, New York City, New York, U.S.A., December 1, 2015 - January 22, 2016.

http://tomrchambers.com/malevich.html
http://tomrchambers.com/sirie_opening.html

Note: this exhibition is in conjunction with the "100 Years of Suprematism" conference, Shapiro Center, Columbia University, New York City, December 11 - 12, 2015. It is organized in celebration of the centenary of Kazimir Malevich’s invention of Suprematism and the first public display of his Suprematist paintings in December, 1915. The two-day conference is organized in association with the Harriman Institute, the Lazar Khidekel Society, and SHERA. It features presentations by an international and renowned group of scholars. Among them are leading researchers in the field from the United States, Russia, and the United Kingdom. The event includes a presentation of "Kazimir Malevich: Letters and Documents, Memoirs and Criticism" (London: Tate, 2015).

http://tomrchambers.com/Malevich Society.htm

2) CaviArt Gallery (two-person show), The Russian Cultural Center "Our Texas", Houston, Texas, U.S.A., March 6 – April 7, 2015.

3) Beyond the Borders (The Guest section) (group show), Novosibirsk Municipal Center of Fine Arts, Novosibirsk, Russia, November 3 - 21, 2010.

4) Homage: Contemporary Art in Digital Media (group show), Art Institute of California, San Diego, California, U.S.A., October 8 - November 8, 2010.

5) The H Gallery (solo show), Houston, Texas, U.S.A., July 10 - August 9, 2010.

6) Homage: Contemporary Art in Digital Media (group show), Escondido Arts Partnership Municipal Gallery, Escondido, California, U.S.A., July 9 - August 21, 2010.

7) aniGma-4 (Fourth Novosibirsk International Festival of Digital Imaging) (group show), Novosibirsk State Art Museum, Novosibirsk, Russia, May 10 - June 10, 2007.

8) Art Gallery (solo show), Fine Arts Department, Zhaoqing University, Zhaoqing, China, April 2 - 15, 2007.

This homage to Kazimir Malevich is a confirmation of Tom R. Chambers' Pixelscapes as Minimalist Art and in keeping with Malevich's Suprematism - the feeling of non-objectivity - the creation of a sense of bliss and wonder via abstraction. Chambers' action of looking within a portrait (photo) of Kazimir Malevich to find the basic component(s), pixel(s) is the same action as Malevich looking within himself - inside the objective world - for a pure feeling in creative art to find his "Black Square", "Black Cross" and other Suprematist works.

http://tomrchambers.com/malevich_dir.html


Nocona - The Early Years

1) Tales 'N' Trails Museum, Nocona, Texas, November 4 - December 31, 2017.

This selection of photographs provided by the citizens and now residing in the Permanent Collection of the Tales 'N' Trails Museum shows the early years of the community and surrounding areas. It puts a "face" and sometimes names to activities over a 100 years ago that were a formative influence. The text is extracted from TSHA (Texas State Historical Association) and other sources to provide as accurate a narrative as possible to reflect the mores and living conditions of the time. The original photographs were scanned by Mike Storey. The restorations, poster layouts, and research (text) are by Tom R. Chambers. The research was edited and approved by Nell Ann McBroom (Director/Curator, Tales 'N' Trails Museum) and Max Brown (Historian).

http://tomrchambers.com/ntey.html


Once Upon a Strand

1) Galveston County Courthouse (solo show), Galveston, Texas, U.S.A., 1974.

2) American National Insurance Archives (solo show), Galveston, Texas, U.S.A., 1974.

This photo project focuses on the interiors of the buildings on the Strand in Galveston, Texas. It is a National Historic Landmark District of mainly Victorian era structures that now house restaurants, antique stores, and curio shops. Because of the Port of Galveston's enormous vessel traffic, the Strand became a popular place for major businesses to locate, including the state's five largest banks at the time, wholesalers, commission merchants, cotton brokers, attorneys and slave auctioneers.


People and Cultures

1) The Roger Williams Park Museum (solo show) (grant - City of Providence), Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A. 1987.

This photo documentary project is based on Chambers’ coverage of Providence, Rhode Island as Personal Photographer to Mayor Joseph R. Paolino, Jr. and City Photographer during 1985 - 1989.


People to People

1) Kumho Art Center (two-person show) (accepted as part of the Kumho Art Foundation Archives), Gwangju, South Korea 1997.

This photo documentary project focuses on the Korean people through portraits. Chambers' photographs are combined with those of a Korean photographer (Choi Ok-soo) to offer a Western-Eastern perspective of documentation.

http://tomrchambers.com/index-21.html


Pixelscapes: First and Second Generations

1) The H Gallery (solo show), Houston, Texas, U.S.A., July 10 - August 9, 2010.

2) Art and Music 2005 (group show), Coves de Canelobre (Caves of Candalabra), Busot, Spain, August 19 - 21, 2005.

3) aniGma-2, The 2d Novosibirsk International Festival of Digital Imaging & Animation (group show), Novosibirsk State Art Museum, Novosibirsk, Russia, April - May, 2005.

4) InterGraphic (group show), Bishkek International Exhibition of Graphic Art, State Museum of Fine Arts, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, February 27 - March 6, 2004.

5) International Festival of Digital Imaging & Animation (group show), Novosibirsk, Russia, October 18 - 19, 2003.

6) Third Novosibirsk International Contemporary Graphic Biennial 2003 (group show), State Picture Gallery, Novosibirsk, Russia, September - November, 2003.

7) Art Is Everywhere (group show), Boston Cyberarts Festival, Art Institute of Boston at Lesley University, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A., April 26 - May 10, 2003.

8) Digital Content Consortium (DCC) Conference (featured artist; solo show) University of North Carolina-Pembroke, March 28-29, with the exhibition to continue at the UNC Art Department/Media Integration Project through May 15, 2003.

9) Museum of Contemporary Art (solo show), Solovki (Solovetskie Ostrova/Solovetskie Islands, White Sea), Russia, Summer, 2002.

10) ArCade-III in Russia (group show) (an international exhibition of computer generated prints), Novosibirsk, Russia (curated by Sue Gollifer, University of Brighton and the London Institute, UK and by Andrey Martynov, LeVall Art Gallery, Novosibirsk, Russia), July 18 - 31, 2002.

11) LeVall Art Gallery (solo show), Novosibirsk, Russia, April 4-17, 2002.

This project focuses on the pixel within the context of Abstractionism and Minimalism. The pixels or Pixelscapes – as Chambers calls them - conform with many of non-objective artists' works. These Pixelscapes are a revelation for him when compared to these non-objective works generated 40 years before the pixel and 80 years before the Digital Revolution.

http://tomrchambers.com/rmde.html


Pixelscapes: Third Generation

1) Museum of Computer Art (MOCA) (solo show), New York, March, 2004.

2) IDAA 2003 (group show) (Juror invitation), VCA Gallery, Victorian College of the Arts, Southbank Victoria, Australia, December, 2003.

3) IDAA 2003 (group show) (Juror invitation), The Academy Gallery, University of Tasmania, Australia, March-April, 2003.

This project focuses on the pixel within the context of Abstractionism and Minimalism. The pixels or Pixelscapes – as Chambers calls them - conform with many of non-objective artists' works. These Pixelscapes are a revelation for him when compared to these non-objective works generated 40 years before the pixel and 80 years before the Digital Revolution.

http://tomrchambers.com/psinsidedeep.html


Pixelscapes: Fourth Generation

1) IDAA 2004 (group show) (Juror invitation), VCA Gallery, Victorian College of the Arts, Southbank Victoria, Australia, August - September, 2004.

2) IDAA 2004 (group show) (Juror invitation), QUT Art Museum, Brisbane, Australia, June 4 - August 15, 2004.

3) IDAA 2004 (group show) (Juror invitation), The Academy Gallery, University of Tasmania, Inveresk, Australia, April-May, 2004.

This project focuses on the pixel within the context of Abstractionism and Minimalism. The pixels or Pixelscapes – as Chambers calls them - conform with many of non-objective artists' works. These Pixelscapes are a revelation for him when compared to these non-objective works generated 40 years before the pixel and 80 years before the Digital Revolution.

http://tomrchambers.com/psinsidedeep2.html


Pixelscapes: Fifth Generation

1) aniGma-3 (group show), The 3rd Novosibirsk International Festival of Digital Imaging & Animation, Novosibirsk State Art Museum, Novosibirsk, Russia, April 6 - May 15, 2006.

2) IDAA 2005 (group show) (Juror invitation), QUT Art Museum, Brisbane, Australia, July - August, 2005.

3) IDAA 2005 (group show) (Juror invitation), VCA Gallery, Victorian College of the Arts, Southbank Victoria, Australia, June - July, 2005.

4) IDAA 2005 (group show) (Juror invitation), The Academy Gallery, University of Tasmania, Inveresk, Australia, March - April, 2005.

This project focuses on the pixel within the context of Abstractionism and Minimalism. The pixels or Pixelscapes – as Chambers calls them - conform with many of non-objective artists' works. These Pixelscapes are a revelation for him when compared to these non-objective works generated 40 years before the pixel and 80 years before the Digital Revolution.

http://tomrchambers.com/pixnoise.html


Pscan Derivatives

1) PFG-2 (group show), Today Art Gallery, Beijing, China, November 4 - 10, 2005.

This project focuses on Pixelscapes that take on a kinetic identity through the utilization of the lens applet, allowing one’s vision to play on both fields (background and simulated foreground via magnification and movement) to establish a relationship - distant and close - between the two. It's also interactive by placing the cursor on the lens and moving it about for closer study.

http://tomrchambers.com/pscandvs.html


Ptone Derivatives

1) Digital Showcase 15 (group show), Austin Museum of Digital Art (AMODA), Austin, Texas, U.S.A., May 28, 2002.

This project focuses on Pixelscapes that take on a kinetic identity through the utilization of the halftone filter and huerot applet, allowing one’s vision to absorb the color (rotation/pattern changes to evoke certain moods.

http://tomrchambers.com/ptonedvs.html


Public Domain Reconstruction

1) Red Lines, Dart Gallery, Information Visualization Symposium (IV2004) (group show), University of London, London, England, July 14-16, 2004.

This project focuses on the gif file. There are an infinite number of animated images (gif files) in the public domain on the Internet, and Chambers reconstructs the purpose of the single gif file through background image utilization. This reconstruction produces a background of Kinetic (e) Art.

http://tomrchambers.com/redlinesanddottodot.html


Retro Providence: 1985-1990

1) Corridor Gallery, City Archives, City Hall (sponsored by Providence City Archives), Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., October 14 - December 14, 2016.

Chambers returns to Providence to showcase a sampling of his coverage as Mayoral and City Photographer for Providence, 1985-1990. The exhibition comprises 60 prints of city activities and its people 26-31 years ago. The coverage over a six-year period is a direct result of a mayor's presence and activity throughout the environs of a city. It is assignment-based via a press secretary's office, City Hall.

The viewers of this exhibit are able to reflect on city environs/activities, and compare yesterday's with today's Providence. For those individuals who were a part of the coverage during that period of time and now, it will undoubtedly hold dear their involvement/participation that comprises this time capsule.

The project is similar to the HOT CITY exhibit that Chambers compiled when he worked for the City of Providence in 1989. At that time, American Photo magazine listed the exhibition in its "Notable Exhibitions" section in their July 1989 issue.

http://tomrchambers.com/retro_prov.html


Southwest of Rusape: The Mucharambeyi Connection

1) SWRMC-1, Hyperlink: PhotoForum Worldwide Exhibition (group show), Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York, U.S.A., 1997.

2) Corridor Gallery (solo show), United States Information Service (USIS) (received a United States Government grant ; officially opened by the U.S. Ambassador to Zimbabwe; and accepted as a part of the USIS Archives.), Harare, Zimbabwe, Africa, 1995.

This photo documentary project is in association with the Mucharambeyi family in Rusape, North East Zimbabwe and sponsored by U.S.I.S., Harare, Zimbabwe as the inaugural exhibition/event for the United States Information center (1995). The Mucharambeyi family attended, and Johnnie Carson, U.S. Ambassador to Zimbabwe, opened the exhibition.

http://tomrchambers.com/index-22.html


Streak 16

1) Dart Gallery, Information Visualization Symposium (IV2003) (group show), University of London, London, England, July 16-18, 2003.

This project appropriates Chambers’ piece, “360” through multiple framing (Web mechanics) to produce “Streak 16”. It is Connective Art in the sense that the viewer can manipulate the overall image by utilizing the vertical and horizontal scroll bars of each frame to create his/her version. When “Streak 16” is manipulated, its repetitive nature seems to be broken, but only in the sense of and due to change in position/placement - creating hybrids of Kinetic Art.

http://tomrchambers.com/streak16.html


The Malevich Malady: Black Square Red Zone

1) The Art of Habit and Addiction (group show), Kallinen Contemporary Art Gallery, Houston, Texas, U.S.A., June 14 - 28, 2014.

Within the context of this exhibition, Kazimir Malevich's "Black Square" represents humanity, and his "Red Square" represents inflammation or the infusion - via the syringe - of the addiction.

http://tomrchambers.com/mal_malady.html


The People of Longhu Town, China

1) Zhao/Chambers Joint Photo Exhibition (two-person show), Yellow River College of Technology, Zhengzhou, China, April, 2005.

2) Zhao/Chambers Joint Photo Exhibition (two-person show), Library Gallery, Sheng Da College, Zhengzhou, China, June, 2004.

This photo documentary project takes a look at the Chinese people through portraits. His photographs are combined with those of a Chinese photographer (Zhao Zhenhai) to offer a Western-Eastern perspective of documentation.

http://tomrchambers.com/longhuimages.html


The Primordial Pixel

1) PP-1, PP-2, The First Catskill Digital Art Show (group show), The Atelier Progressif Creative Art Space, Catskill, New York, U.S.A., March 11 - April 8, 2016.

http://tomrchambers.com/primordial_pixel.html


To be

1) Shakespeare 450 (group show), Novosibirsk State Regional Scientific Library, Novosibirsk, Russia, June 1 - 30, 2014.

2) Shakespeare 450 (group show), Centre of Contemporary Youth Culture "Etazh/Storey", Novosibirsk, Russia, April 25 - May 20, 2014.

3) Shakespeare 450 (group show), Shakespearean Literary Festival, Faculty of Foreign Languages, Novosibirsk State Pedagogical University, Russia, April 23, 2014.

This project celebrates William Shakespeare's 450th birthday anniversary, 1564 – 2014.

http://tomrchambers.com/shakes_450.html


Toe Totum

1) Glass Membrane: Scanner to Screen (group show), Digital Studio, UCR/California Museum of Photography, Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A., March 23 - May 12, 2002.

http://tomrchambers.com/index-67.html


Tom Chambers Looks at H.J. Bott

1) The Rosenberg Library (two-person show), Galveston, Texas, U.S.A., 1975.

This project focuses on Harvey J. Bott’s “Fetal Form” series. Bott is a sculptor. Chambers worked with Bott to provide photo documentation of his “DoV” concept and sculptures.

http://www.hjbott.com/


Tom Series

1) (First Love Tom, Apple Tom, Apollo Tom), Face to Face (group show), Modern Fine Arts Museum, Rostov-on-Don, Russia, August 18, 2017.

2) (Hometown Tom, Tube Tom, Apple Tom, Photo Tom), The FACE (group show), Tolijatti State Art Museum, Russia, October - December, 2015.

3) (Hometown Tom, Tube Tom, Apple Tom, Photo Tom), The FACE (group show), Perm State Art Gallery, Russia, May - July, 2015.

4) (Tube Tom), The Selfie Show: An Art Exhibition of Self-portraits (group show), Museum of New Art, Troy, Michigan, U.S.A., May - June, 2015.

5) (Hometown Tom, Tube Tom, Apple Tom, Photo Tom), The FACE (group show), Villa Ichon, Bremen, Germany, November - December, 2014.

6) (Hometown Tom, Tube Tom, Apple Tom, Photo Tom), The FACE (group show), Samara State Art Museum, Russia, May - July, 2014.

7) (Hometown Tom, Tube Tom, Apple Tom, Photo Tom), The FACE (group show), SFA Galleries, Nacogdoches, Texas, U.S.A., September - October, 2013.

8) (Hometown Tom, Tube Tom, Apple Tom, Photo Tom), The FACE (group show), Photo Festival, Arezzo, Italy, September - October, 2012.

9) (Hometown Tom, Tube Tom, Apple Tom, Photo Tom), The FACE (group show), Manomentr Gallery, Moscow, Russia, February, 2012.

10) (Hometown Tom, Tube Tom, Apple Tom, Photo Tom), The FACE (group show), Eumeria Gallery, Tokyo, Japan, December 12 - 17, 2011.

11) (Hometown Tom, Tube Tom, Apple Tom, Photo Tom), The FACE (group show), Rosphoto Exhibition Centre for Photography, St. Petersburg, Russia, November 25 - December 1, 2011.

12) (Hometown Tom, Tube Tom, Apple Tom, Photo Tom), The FACE (group show), Gallery, American University of Paris, Paris, France, October 11 - November 7, 2011.

13) (Hometown Tom, Tube Tom, Apple Tom, Photo Tom), The FACE (group show), Metenkov Museum of photography, Ekaterinburg, Russia, August 17 - September 18, 2011.

14) (Hometown Tom, Tube Tom, Apple Tom, Photo Tom), The FACE (group show), Chelyabinsk Museum of arts, Chelyabinsk, Russia, July 5 - August 9, 2011.

15) (Hometown Tom, Tube Tom, Apple Tom, Photo Tom), The FACE (group show), Roba Gallery, Omsk, Russia, June 18 - July 6, 2011.

16) (Hometown Tom, Tube Tom, Apple Tom, Photo Tom), The FACE (group show), Krasnoyarsk Cultural Museum Centre, Russia, March 31 - May 22, 2011.

17) (Hometown Tom, Tube Tom, Apple Tom, Photo Tom), The FACE (group show), Novosibirsk State Museum of Local History, Novosibirsk, Russia, February 16 - March 14, 2011.

18) (China Tom, Tao Tom, Hometown Tom, AHS Tom), SELF/SOUL (Joint Student Exhibition, Zhaoqing University and University of Louisville[Louisville, Kentucky, U.S.A.]) (group show), Fine Arts Department, Zhaoqing University, Zhaoqing, Guangdong Province, China, December 1 - 25, 2006.

19) (China Tom, Tao Tom, Hometown Tom, Target Tom), Faculty Exhibition (group show), Fine Arts Department, Zhaoqing University, Zhaoqing, Guangdong Province, China, November 25 - December 1, 2006.

The self-portrait is utilized to project Chambers’ life experiences. His portrait remains constant with the experience (situation) indicated as a change or flux in the image. The accompanying text details his experience with the inclusion of links to the Internet for additional information. “Tom Series” is not only an artwork about Chambers' life - biography (visual/textual) - but also a reference tool - a study of history through his existence. The constancy of the same portrait (Chambers' image) indicates a human being's existence within a world/an environment that's ever influencing and changing the psyche and at some point in time - later (twilight) years for this individual, the psyche begins to take control and evaluate the process.

http://tomrchambers.com/tom_series.html


Variations on the Dan Mask

1) Mezzanine Gallery (solo show), National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe, Africa, December, 1995.

An African traditional mask from the Dan Tribe, Eastern Liberia (National Gallery of Zimbabwe Permanent Collection: PC - 6400 - 0147) is the object for the photogram, and then manipulation of the non-exposed area generated from this original mask form to vary the look. There's a transference from a traditional form to a contemporary one, or in other words, this contemporary treatment remains within the confines of the traditional form (through direct contact), and borders on Abstract Art that reduces natural appearances to simplified forms.

http://tomrchambers.com/index-12.html


Warhol’s Austin

1) The Factory: An Andy Warhol Experience (group show), Academia Lounge Gallery, Austin, Texas, U.S.A., January 31, 2019.

This digital art project treats four photographs made of the Austin State Capitol Building in Warhol fashion using “repetitive imagery” and garish colors.

warhol_austin_2
warhol_austin_4
warhol_austin_5
warhol_austin_6


Wide-screen China

1) Captured (group show), Houston Institute For Culture, The Haven Center, Houston, Texas, U.S.A., October 6 - November 1, 2007.

This photo documentary project comprises black and white photographs in wide-screen format. Chambers uses this format reminiscent of the CinemaScope movies that impressed him when he was a child and cognizant of the popularity of wide-screen television in today's homes. The bit of distortion seen in most of the images creates a sense of drama with a focus on darks and lights to set a certain mood. There's an otherworldliness that seems to run through the series of photographs.

http://tomrchambers.com/widescreen_dir.html


Yin Yang Future

1) Imagining the Future We Want (group show), VALISE Gallery, Vashon, Washington, U.S.A., September, 2011.

This project is in keeping with the "Digital Revolution", vis-à-vis, the iconic male and female font symbols that have been altered to move towards the need for humanity's change in thought - "Yin Yang" - the idea of balance. Contributors to the exhibition were invited to create an image and/or text that would focus on a reconstructive vision of the future.

http://tomrchambers.com/yin_yang.html


Venue Chronology

International Digital Art Gallery (D-ART) for the 22nd International Conference on Information Visualization & 15th Conference Computer Graphics, Imaging and Visualization, University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy, July 10-13, 2018. Organized in London, England.
Experimental Animation and Video Art Program, LINOLEUM International Contemporary Animation and Media-Art Festival, Ukraine, September 28 - October 1, 2017.
Tales 'N' Trails Museum, Nocona, Texas, September 23 - October 27, 2017 and November 4 - December 31, 2017.
Modern Fine Arts Museum, Rostov-on-Don, Russia, August 18, 2017.
Digital Art Community (DAC), SIGGRAPH 2017, Los Angeles, July 30 - August 3, 2017.
Corridor Gallery, City Archives, City Hall, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., October 14 - December 14, 2016.
The Atelier Progressif Creative Art Space, Catskill, New York, U.S.A., March 11 - April 8, 2016.
Atrium Gallery, Harriman Institute, Columbia University, New York City, New York, U.S.A., December 1, 2015 - January 22, 2016.
Tolijatti State Art Museum, Russia, October - December, 2015.
One Month Gallery (OMG), Moscow, Russia, June 8 - July 8, 2015.
Perm State Art Gallery, Russia, May - July, 2015.
Museum of New Art, Troy, Michigan, U.S.A., May - June, 2015.
CaviArt Gallery, The Russian Cultural Center, Houston, Texas, U.S.A., March 6 – April 7, 2015.
Villa Ichon, Bremen, Germany, November - December, 2014.
Samara State Art Museum, Russia, May - July, 2014.
Kallinen Contemporary Art Gallery, Houston, Texas, U.S.A., June 14 - 28, 2014.
Novosibirsk State Regional Scientific Library, Novosibirsk, Russia, June 1 - 30, 2014.
Centre of Contemporary Youth Culture, Novosibirsk, Russia, April 25 - May 20, 2014.
Faculty of Foreign Languages, Novosibirsk State Pedagogical University, Russia, April 23, 2014.
SFA Galleries, Nacogdoches, Texas, U.S.A., September - October, 2013.
Arezzo, Italy, September - October, 2012.
Manomentr Gallery, Moscow, Russia, February, 2012.
Eumeria Gallery, Tokyo, Japan, December 12 - 17, 2011.
Rosphoto Exhibition Centre for Photography, St. Petersburg, Russia, November 25 - December 1, 2011.
Gallery, American University of Paris, Paris, France, October 11 - November 7, 2011.
Metenkov Museum of photography, Ekaterinburg, Russia, August 17 - September 18, 2011.
VALISE Gallery, Vashon, Washington, U.S.A., September, 2011.
Chelyabinsk Museum of arts, Chelyabinsk, Russia, July 5 - August 9, 2011.
Roba Gallery, Omsk, Russia, June 18 - July 6, 2011.
Krasnoyarsk Cultural Museum Centre, Russia, March 31 - May 22, 2011.
Novosibirsk State Museum of Local History, Novosibirsk, Russia, February 16 - March 14, 2011.
Novosibirsk Municipal Center of Fine Arts, Novosibirsk, Russia, November 3 - 21, 2010.
Art Institute of California, San Diego, California, U.S.A., October 8 - November 8, 2010.
The H Gallery, Houston, Texas, U.S.A., July 10 - August 9, 2010.
Escondido Arts Partnership Municipal Gallery, Escondido, California, U.S.A., July 9 - August 21, 2010.
A&I Gallery, Los Angeles, California, U.S.A., July 8 - August 13, 2010.
Huan Tie Art Museum, Beijing, China, November 9 - 19, 2008.
The Haven Center, Houston Institute For Culture, Houston, Texas, U.S.A., October 6 - November 1, 2007.
Novosibirsk State Art Museum, Novosibirsk, Russia, May 10 - June 10, 2007.
Art Gallery, Fine Arts Department, Zhaoqing University, Zhaoqing, China, April 2 - 15, 2007.
Art Gallery, Fine Arts Department, Zhaoqing University, Zhaoqing, Guangdong Province, China, December 1 - 25, 2006.
Art Gallery, Fine Arts Department, Zhaoqing University, Zhaoqing, Guangdong Province, China, November 25 - December 1, 2006.
National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad, India, July 10 – 28, 2006.
Novosibirsk State Art Museum, Novosibirsk, Russia, April 6 - May 15, 2006.
Today Art Gallery, Beijing, China, November 4 - 10, 2005.
Coves de Canelobre (Caves of Candalabra), Busot, Spain, August 19 - 21, 2005.
QUT Art Museum, Brisbane, Australia, July - August, 2005.
VCA Gallery, Victorian College of the Arts, Southbank Victoria, Australia, June - July, 2005.
Novosibirsk State Art Museum, Novosibirsk, Russia, April - May, 2005.
Yellow River College of Technology, Zhengzhou, China, April, 2005.
The Academy Gallery, University of Tasmania, Inveresk, Australia, March - April, 2005.
VCA Gallery, Victorian College of the Arts, Southbank Victoria, Australia, August - September, 2004.
QUT Art Museum, Brisbane, Australia, June 4 - August 15, 2004.
Dart Gallery, University of London, London, England, July 14 - 16, 2004.
Library Gallery, Sheng Da College, Zhengzhou, China, June, 2004.
The Academy Gallery, University of Tasmania, Inveresk, Australia, April - May, 2004.
Museum of Computer Art (MOCA), New York, March, 2004.
State Museum of Fine Arts, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, February 27 - March 6, 2004.
VCA Gallery, Victorian College of the Arts, Southbank Victoria, Australia, December, 2003.
Novosibirsk, Russia, October 18 - 19, 2003.
State Picture Gallery, Novosibirsk, Russia, September - November, 2003.
Dart Gallery, University of London, London, England, July 16 - 18, 2003.
Art Institute of Boston at Lesley University, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A., April 26 - May 10, 2003.
The Academy Gallery, University of Tasmania, Australia, March - April, 2003.
University of North Carolina-Pembroke, North Carolina, March 28-29 and May 15, 2003.
Museum of Contemporary Art, Solovki (Solovetskie Ostrova/Solovetskie Islands, White Sea), Russia, Summer, 2002.
LeVall Art Gallery, Novosibirsk, Russia), July 18 - 31, 2002.
Austin Museum of Digital Art (AMODA), Austin, Texas, U.S.A., May 28, 2002.
LeVall Art Gallery, Novosibirsk, Russia, April 4 - 17, 2002.
Noosa Regional Gallery, Australia, 2001.
PhotoForum, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York, U.S.A., 1997.
Kumho Art Center, Gwangju, South Korea, 1997.
Corridor Gallery, United States Information Service (USIS), Harare, Zimbabwe, Africa, 1995.
Museum of Contemporary Art, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio, U.S.A., April 13 - May 14,1992.
G.F. Gallery, Austin, Texas, U.S.A., February 20 - March 12, 1992.
Po Gallery, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1992.
Rhode Island Black Heritage Society, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1991.
Campus Art Gallery, Community College of Rhode Island, Lincoln, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1991.
Rhode Island State Archives, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A. 1991.
Gallery One, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., April, 1990.
Corridor Gallery, Rhode Island Hospital Trust National Bank, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., June 16 - August 31, 1989.
The Old Colony House, Newport, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1988.
The State House, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1988.
The Barrington Public Library, Barrington, Rhode Island, U.S.A. 1988.
Corridor Gallery, Department of Transportation, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1988.
Faculty Club Gallery, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1987.
The Warwick Museum of Art, Warwick, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1987.
The Narragansett Pier Free Library, Narrangansett, Rhode Island, U.S.A. 1987.
CCE Gallery, The University of Rhode Island, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1987.
The Roger Williams Park Museum, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A. 1987.
Gallery One, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A., 1987.
The Fleet Center Gallery, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A. 1986.
The Silver Bullet Gallery, Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A. 1986.
Corridor Gallery, T.F. Green Airport, Warwick, Rhode Island, U.S.A. 1986.
The Gallery of Fine Arts, Daytona Beach Community College, Daytona Beach, Florida, U.S.A., 1985.
Southern Light Gallery, Amarillo College, Amarillo, Texas, U.S.A., 1985.
Medical Library, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, Texas, U.S.A., 1982.
The Museum of Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, U.S.A., 1981.
The Rosenberg Library, Galveston, Texas, U.S.A., 1975.
Galveston County Courthouse, Galveston, Texas, U.S.A., 1974.
American National Insurance Archives, Galveston, Texas, U.S.A., 1974.


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